Thursday, April 13, 2017

Argie 15 - Fitting the Daggerboard Casing & Rub-Rails

Moving on with the Argie 15 project, I covered the bottom runners in my previous post. The runners serve multiple purposes, which I forgot to explain. The runners give some protection to the bottom when beaching the boat, by lifting it a bit when pulled onto rough beaches. They strengthen the bottom by serving as stringers but, being on the outside of the boat, they keep the bottom of the cockpit clean for a more comfortable sleeping space when camp-cruising. They also help to improve the efficiency of the planing surface by channeling the water parallel to centreline rather than losing energy by moving off to each side.

At this stage we also checked the fit of the daggerboard. It slid nicely through the slot in the hull. Kevin had glued the end spacers to the one side of the daggerboard casing but the second side was still loose. When we checked the fit, the board wouldn't go through. Checking the sides for straightness showed that they bowed inwards a few millimeters, enough to jam the board. That gave warning that care had to be taken when gluing it all together to ensure that the sides remained straight throughout the height of the casing.
The daggerboard casing glued up, including the top and bottom framing. The blue pieces at the top are spacers to force the sides against the framing, to ensure that there is no curvature in the surfaces to reduce the width and jam the board.
The casing glued in place. The blue spacers were left in place until the glue had cured, so that there would be no chance of the casing distorting and reducing the width of the slot.
Next on the "to do" list is the rub-rails. These are laminated to the outside of the hull, at the gunwales. They stiffen the hull, changing a fairly flexible plywood edge into a robust gunwale that is capable of taking a knock if needed. Some builders of the Argie 15 don't use this detail from our drawings, instead changing it to an internal scuppered inwale detail. That is a very pretty detail that is well-suited to traditional rowing boats and similar craft, adding the benefit of tie-off points anywhere that you want along the gunwales but is more difficult to do. For the Argie 15, which will be sailed with the crew sitting along the sides of the cockpit, the inwale creates an uncomfortable surface to lean against instead of the clean surface of the original design.

Kevin called on me to assist with fitting the rub-rails. The laminations are fitted in single lengths (scarphed from short pieces), so are awkward for one person to handle in a confined space. Getting them correctly positioned on the wet glue while also working with clamps calls for some ingenuity if working by yourself. It is simpler to call in a pair of extra hands.

This job calls for lots and lots of clamps. We did both sides in one evening, which needed all of Kevin's clamps as well as all of mine. If you are brave and short of time then you might want to laminate all layers at the same time. This is risky because it needs slow-setting glue that won't set before you are able to wet-out all strips, get them into place, manipulate three or fours slippery lengths into proper alignment and get all the clamps in place and correctly tensioned.

We chose instead to do one layer at a time. Rather than four layers of equal thickness, Kevin prepared inner and outer layers of poplar and a middle layer of cedar of double-thickness. This gives a nice stiff gunwale with a tougher outer surface than if all layers were cedar. It is also very pretty.
Kevin with the Argie 15 after clamping the first layer of the gunwale.
Two days later we also glued the second layer of the rub-rail. We managed to break one of the scarphs even before starting with the gluing. The epoxy was not fully cured yet so the epoxy was well short of final strength. We were able to still laminate it onto the  first layer by carefully clamping at the joint to hold it closed against the bending loads applied by the curvature to which it had to comply.

When gluing all laminations after the first one, it is best to get the bottom completely flush and let the top look after itself. The reason is that it is very easy to clean up and neatly finish the top  but much more difficult to do the same to the bottom of the rail because of the adjacent plywood.

That's all for now. To see more of this and our other designs, go to our main website or our mobile website.

Monday, April 3, 2017

Finishing the Bottom of the Argie 15

My last post was about making the rudder and daggerboards for the Argie 15. While I was doing that work, Kevin Agee was making good progress on the bottom. He has glassed all of the outside seams, sanded, filled and faired them so that the chines are smooth and fair curves, cut the daggerboard slot and installed the bottom runners and skeg.

This work all needs to be nicely done because the hard chine edges are what defines a hull like this. Unfair and wavy edges with lumps and bumps catch the eye very quickly and also cast odd shadow lines, spoiling the overall look of the finished boat. It is worthwhile taking this work slowly and being very happy with your own work before moving on to the next step.
The tapes have been sanded smooth and the tape edges have been feathered. 

If this boat was to be clear-finished then sanding and feathering the tape edges is about as far as fairing can go before final epoxy coats and varnish are applied. Our boat will be painted, so fairing can be more conventional and more extensive. This photo shows epoxy fairing compound  that has been applied then sanded down to fair it into the surface, making it completely disappear.
A closer view of a chine after fairing. It fills the slight hollow alongside the tape because of the two thicknesses of glass sitting on the surface of the plywood.
Runners glued to bottom. They are being held by temporary screws, assisted by a ratchet strap at the bow.
A sliding bar clamp in the daggerboard slot helps to keep the end of the centre runner in contact while the glue cures.
Sliding bar clamps secure the aft ends of the runners and skeg at the transom. The runners will be trimmed off flush.
Junction of the centre runner with the skeg.
The final coat of epoxy resin before turning the hull back upright for deck finishing.
The next post will likely be about laminating the rubbing strakes to the gunwales and other finishing work on the decks and transom.

To see more of this and our other designs, go to our main website or our mobile website.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Shaping the Argie 15 Foils

I said in my previous Argie 15 blog post that Kevin Agee laminated the blanks for the foils from strips of cedar and poplar. Aside from making very attractive foils, it also has the benefit that they can be made from relatively inexpensive wood that can be bought at your local hardware store. Cedar that is available from Lowes or Home Depot is generally of inferior standard that may not be suitable for foils. Laminating strips of timber of differing characteristics can use the one to strengthen the other, at the same time serving a decorative function.
Daggerboard blank, cut to outline shape and sanded smooth, ready for shaping.
I won't go deeply into the shaping process for the foils, I will do that in a separate post on my Boatbuilders Tips blog. That should be posted in the next few weeks. For this post I will show only the basics.

The daggerboard is shaped to an airfoil section below the hull and rectangular where it is inside the daggerboard slot. Similarly, the rudder blade is foil-shaped in the water and rectangular where it is inside the rudder stock. I did this shaping with a hand plane, a belt sander, a Japanese Shinto rasp and hand-sanding with a sanding block.
The shaped daggerboard, foil section over most of its length, rectangular in the hull.
Note all the sanding dust on the floor, which must all be vacuumed up before any glassing starts.
The shaped rudder blade. Holes are for pivot bolt and up- and down-haul lines.
The next stage was to sheathe them in fiberglass fabric, in epoxy resin. The rudder is small enough to clamp in a vice, leading edge upward, then to drape the epoxy-saturated glass fabric over both sides of the blade at the same time. This I did by wetting out the glass with epoxy on a flat sheet of plastic, then moving it to the rudder, which was firmly clamped in the vice fitted with soft jaws. The top of the rudder is in the vice, so can't be glassed at the same time and must be glassed as a separate operation later.
Glass fabric draped over rudder to glass both sides at the same time, meeting at the trailing edge.
The daggerboard is a lot larger then the rudder, so maneuvering a piece of glass fabric large enough to cover both sides and weighed down with epoxy would be very awkward, so I chose to glass that one side at a time. I laid the board on a sheet of plastic to protect my workbench from droplets of epoxy. Doing one side at a time allowed me to lay the dry glass over the whole of one side of the board, wetting it out with epoxy in place. I supported the glass that was projecting past the trailing edge with a spacer under the plastic sheet, to stop the glass from drooping, which would mess up the clean trailing edge that is needed.
First side of the daggerboard glassed.
Some of the edges of the rudder and daggerboard don't have glass covering them after this, so they are covered with glass tape to complete the covering. There is also a lot of sanding going on between these steps, to feather edges of glass fabrics and tapes and to generally make smooth surfaces.
Glass-taping the leading edge and bottom  of the daggerboard. This batch of epoxy went off faster than I expected due to warmer air temperature, so the glass is a bit rough in places, needing more sanding.
I added another two coats of epoxy over all the surfaces, with more sanding between coats and after the final one. As a last step on the rudder blade I blanked off one side of all holes with painters tape then filled those holes with epoxy. I let it stand for about 15 minutes for the epoxy to soak into the timber, then removed the tape to allow the excess to drain out. This step is to prevent (or at least minimise) the absorption of water into the wood.
Daggerboard and rudder after 3 coats of epoxy, before final sanding.
The daggerboard still needs a handle, so I cut this from a poplar plank, in two matching pieces. I glued these to the faces of the board along the top edge.
Shaped timber handle pieces glued to both sides of the daggerboard. The board has been sanded to ready it for finishing with varnish.
I have now sanded and epoxy-coated the handle and the foils are nearly ready for varnish as the final finish.

To see more of this and our other designs, go to our main website or our mobile website.

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Argie 15 Dinghy Next Stage

In my last post about his Argie 15 project, Kevin Agee closed in all of the seats. What remained was to tidy up the drains through the centre seat. This he did with an angle grinder to trim them flush with the bulkhead and the fillets against the hull skin.
Trimming the port drain, the starboard one still projecting
 from the seat.
The drains are neatly trimmed and Kevin called me in to help
 him turn the hull over. I got the lighter end.
Kevin at the heavier end. The slight V in the aft sections is
achieved by scribing half-way through the plywood from
the outer face.
Turned over and ready for glassing the outside of the chines.
The chines were glued with epoxy adhesive between the ties before they were
 removed. Now the gaps will be filled before the glass tape is applied.
Also going ahead are the rudder and daggerboard. This started by laminating blanks from strips of cedar and poplar glued with epoxy adhesive, to give a striped effect. Clear-finishing with varnish over fibreglass/epoxy brightens the colours, to give a very attractive finish.
The daggerboard blank, sanded smooth and ready for shaping.
Kevin laminated the blanks and cut the outline shapes, then gave them to me to shape the foils and cover with fibreglass/epoxy. I will cover that work in separate posts.

To see more of this and our other designs go to our main website or our mobile website.

Friday, March 17, 2017

DH550 Kit Shipped to Southern Africa

Exocetus Yachts has shipped another kit for the DH550 sailing catamaran, this one to a builder in Southern Africa. This was more than a CNC plywood kit, it included many extras in the form of equipment and materials for the boat. The total package needed a 40ft container to keep it all together. The photos below show the order during loading. Exocetus is able to customize their kits to suit any builder, from a partial plywood CNC kit through to almost everything needed to build the boat.
"Wild Vanilla", prototype of the DH550 design. This is what the completed boat will look like.
Some of the components of the building stocks.
Pre-formed plywood panels for the hull radius.
Plywood and more plywood, CNC-cut and clearly referenced for assembly.
On top are timbers for stringers and other structural members.
Generators and engines. Behind them, porthole frames, also cut with CNC equipment.
Hardware, plumbing, electrical and other equipment.
Epoxies, tanks and more equipment
Container packed and ready to be closed and sealed.
Container loaded and heading for the ship.
To see more of this and our other designs, go to our main website or our mobile website.

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Aluminium Vickers 45 launched in Italy

"Alemar" is an aluminium Vickers 45AC, built in Florence, Italy and launched a few weeks ago. She is owned by friends Marco and Alessio, who have also built her. Marco is a computer programmer with his own business and Alessio is a woodworker in the boatbuilding industry. I was fortunate to be hosted by Marco and his lovely wife Anna for a few days when I visited Italy for the launch of an aluminium Dix 38 Pilot about 6 years ago.

Marco and Alessio appear to have done a great job of building the cruiser of their dreams. The hull looks to be nicely faired with a beautiful standard of finish. They have modified the shape of my superstructure design, adding Italian flair. This is not surprising, considering the stylishly beautiful sports cars that are built by Italian factories. I remember that Marco asked me why I was rebuilding a British Lotus sports car and not an Italian Ferrari. Well, we can't make everybody happy.

To read the full story about their build, go to the "Alemar" blog, where you can also follow their sailing adventures. It is in Italian but this is easily translated if accessed through Google Chrome.
Ready for launch.
Nice standard of finish.
About to get wet.
Afloat.
Italian styling added to pilothouse roof.
Waiting for her rig.
Rig up, floating nicely.
I look forward to sailing updates from "Alemar" and also sailing photos.

To see more of this and our other designs, go to our main website or our mobile website.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Kidz At Sea Racing in the Caribbean

The students of the Kidz at Sea boatbuilding and Sailtraining program have been racing again in the Sint Maarten Heineken Regatta. They race on the Didi 26 "Purple Heart", which they built in their boatbuilding program. They are also building a sistership to join in the racing next year. They build these boats using our plywood CNC kits, shipped to them from Maryland.

Garth Steyn, who runs the programs, sent me these photos of the students racing their boat.
Getting some high-speed downwind action.
Nice new sponsored asymmetrical.
New sponsored jib as well.
To see more of this and our other designs, go to our main website or our mobile website.


Sunday, March 5, 2017

Bruynzeel Yacht "Stormy" Needs Help

Most boatbuilders in the world will know the name Bruynzeel, manufacturers of high quality marine plywoods, among other wood products sold worldwide. I have used their plywood on various of the boats that I have built.

Kees Bruynzeel was an accomplished yachtsman and boatbuilder, who commissioned Ricus van de Stadt to draw a few designs for him to build. One of these was the 52ft "Stormy", which he skippered to 3rd overall and 2nd in Class II in the inaugural Cape to Rio Race in 1971. He skippered her to line honours and handicap wins in the 1973 Cape to Rio Race after suffering three heart attacks in the previous year.
"Stormy" as she was when Kees Bruynzeel owned her
And as "Lady Margaret", with extended stern
"Stormy" has changed hands a couple of times since then, been renamed "Lady Margaret" and had an aluminium bolt-on stern extension added. She currently has a Virginia Beach owner, who started a major refit but ill health prevents him from continuing.

"Stormy" sorely needs a new owner to take over and complete the work that was started. I have done a quick inspection of her laminated wood hull and it appears to be very sound, aside from a couple of small patches of superficial rot where some water has been allowed to lie. She has been redecked except that the cockpit has been left for rebuilding after the interior and engine work are completed.

All of her seems to be there. The structural interior is still in place, all loose interior items are stored inside the owner's home. He has a newer engine to replace her old one, as well as a generator and loads of teak that was planned to be laid over the fibreglass-sheathed plywood deck.

"Stormy" is available to go free to a good home where she can be completed and go sailing again. The new engine, generator and teak are not included free but can be bought for a reasonable price that must be negotiated with the current owner. Removing and relocating her and all the materials and equipment must be paid for by whoever takes over ownership.
"Lady Margaret" in a Virginia Beach garden.
Galley, representative of interior.
Aft cabin, structural joinery in place but loose bits in dry storage.
I sailed a major coastal race on the sistership "Stormkaap" in about 1978, in some serious Cape of Good Hope weather. The boat fared a lot better than I did. These are seaworthy, strong and weatherly ocean voyagers. "Stormy" deserves another chance at ocean voyaging, not to die somewhere in a breaker's yard.

Anyone interested in taking over this great boat and restoring her can contact me via email, then I will connect you with the owner.

Monday, February 27, 2017

Argie 15 Seats Closed In

The interior of our new Argie 15 is progressing nicely, in the capable hands of amateur boatbuilder Kevin Agee. He is achieving a nice finish, even in those places that will seldom be seen.
Insides of seat compartments painted with 3 coats of epoxy for long-term protection, finished with white polyurethane paint. All surfaces in those compartments were sanded smooth to remove any roughness that could damage clothing or anything else that may be stowed in there, or hands and arms that may reach in to retrieve them. The reflective white paint makes it possible to see to the remote corners, not possible with clear-finished wood.
Seat tops also epoxy-coated and finished with white paint before fitting. Note that the gluing surfaces have been left uncoated for proper adhesion.
Ready for seat tops to be fitted.
Seat tops fitted, faired and sanded. The tops were weighted down with bricks and other weights, rather than screwing them down. Once the glue has cured any fasteners would be redundant anyway.
View from the pointy end. Plenty of  comfortable seating for a  pretty big family.
The benefit of white-painted  lockers, well-lit for finding things and for cleaning. This is looking down into the bow seat.
Transom doubler installed above seat level. This serves as an internal stiffener and a clamping surface when an outboard motor is used.
My next post about the Argie 15 will likely be about the rudder and daggerboard foils, which I am shaping in my garage.

For more info about this and our other designs, visit our main website or our mobile website.